TspCheck ~ Loudspeaker Thiele / Small Paramaters


As the program name suggests, TspCheck is a program that checks whether the determined or specified TS parameters of a loudspeaker match. Often you can then find out, for example, that the efficiency has been rounded up a bit too benevolently, or you can estimate the membrane mass, the resilience of the restraint, etc. by cleverly combining the information available.

In addition, the following is determined:

  • Max. Lin. SPL @ 50 Hz in CB – the maximum sound pressure that can be achieved in a closed housing at 50 Hz using the maximum linear stroke
  • SPL_m = SPL_e – the frequency from which the maximum achievable sound pressure at full input power is stroke limited.

http://www.picosound.de/E_SOFT.HTM#tspchk

The Loudspeaker Explorer ~ Colaboratory Notebook


A speaker measurement visualization, analysis and comparison tool.

https://colab.research.google.com/github/dechamps/LoudspeakerExplorer-rendered/blob/master/Loudspeaker_Explorer.ipynb#scrollTo=cell-1

AnSpec ~ Analog-style Spectrum Analyzer


AnSpec is an analog-style one/third-octave spectrum analyzer AAX, AudioUnit and VST plugin for professional sound and music production applications. It was designed to be a handy visual feedback tool for those who like visual smoothness and easiness of use of analog analyzers. AnSpec also provides peak level indication.

While there are no adjustable parameters available in this plugin, you can still change level meter ballistics and resize plugin’s window.

Features:

  • 1/3 octave analog-style spectrum analyzer
  • Peak level indication
  • User interface window resizing
  • Stereo and mono analysis
  • All sample rates support
  • Zero processing latency
  • User interface color schemes
  • Resizable user interface
  • Retina and High DPI support

anspec

www.voxengo.com/product/anspec

Gearogs ~ Audio Hardware Database & Marketplace


The scope of the Gearogs project includes things like turntables (including all-acoustic phonographs), amplifiers, speakers, mixing desks, effects including spring and plate reverbs, and microphones. It includes instruments that create their sound directly via electronic means (analog and digital synthesizers, for example), but not electro-acoustic instruments such as electric guitars, Fender Rhodes electric pianos and the like, nor electro-mechanical instruments such as the Mellotron, nor opto-electronic instruments such as the Optigan.

Common scenarios where this equipment will be found are in recording studios, hi-fi, and DJ type setups.

https://www.gearogs.com/